Mar. 30th, 2013

bagheera_san: (Default)
Most of the reading I have to do for my exams is fairly boring in that it's stuff I already know about or have read before but need to revise (like gender linguistics, or Gothic literature) but some of it is also new and interesting. One of the two fields I picked for my oral exam in English linguistics is "cognitive linguistics and conceptual metaphor theory" and one of the monographies I had to read for this is a book called "The Way We Think" by Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner (2002) and it's both challenging, interesting and full of weird examples that make the somewhat dry topic of cognitive operations a lot more fun. It's more a cognitive science/psychology book than a proper linguistics book, but it explains the mechanisms that underlie many aspects of language: analogy, grammar, metaphors, counterfactual statements (i.e. lies, stories, speculation) and how we manage to talk about complex, abstract or novel things by using a few simple human scale patterns.

non-fiction books I loved as a teenager, science as mythology, cognitive linguistics, metaphors, blending, hooker AUs, Turtle Starfleet, jail bait )

So, it's a really interesting book. (yes, I have been working for seven hours straight and now am too tired to finish this post in a proper way.)

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bagheera_san

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